Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (2023)

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (1)

Anthropometry is the science that defines physical measures of a person’s size, form, and functional capacities. Applied to occupational injury prevention, anthropometric measurements are used to study the interaction of workers with tasks, tools, machines, vehicles, and personal protective equipment — especially to determine the degree of protection against dangerous exposures, whether chronic or acute.

Designs that are incompatible with normal anthropometric measurements of a workforce may result in unwanted incidents.

  • The misfit of a heavy equipment cabin to a worker may produce operator blind spots that expose workers on foot to struck-by injuries.
  • Inadequate length or configuration of seatbelts may lead to non-use of seatbelts, which affect post-crash survivability.
  • Inadequate fit of personal protective equipment cannot provide workers with sufficient protection from health and injury exposures.

Existing data on the size and shape of industrial workers is limited. Because of the lack of anthropometric data for the general worker population, safety researchers have generally relied on data drawn from studies of military personnel, most of which was collected during the 1950s to 1970s. However, substantial anthropometric variability exists among the various U.S. workforce populations, and they are quite different from the average military population. Industrial workers, such as the agriculture, truck driver, and firefighter workforces, are also anthropometrically very different from the average civilian population (Hsiao et al, 2002).

Diverse workforces in many occupations, as well as new roles for women in the workforce, require body-size data for designing adequate workplaces, systems, and personal protective equipment. In the past, variance in body dimensions was typically reported as means and standard deviations for various body segments (Roebuck et al., 1975). This approach was successful in generating broad parameters for personal protective equipment (PPE) sizing but was deficient in generating the detailed fit information needed for workplace, PPE, and other equipment design.

Technological development in recent years has advanced the basic science of human size and shape studies in 3-dimensional forms (3D). Also, computer-generated human models are now available for anthropometric analysis. These advances in anthropometric science and computer-based human-form modeling have opened various research avenues for improving workplace and protective equipment design as well as anthropometric fit within complex systems.

Hsiao, H., Long, D., Snyder, K. (2002). Anthropometric differences among occupational groups. Ergonomics, 45(2), 136-152.

Roebuck, J. A. (1975). Engineering Anthropometry Methods (Wiley Series in Human Factors). John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Anthropometric design procedures must take into consideration the large variation in dimensions from person to person and from population to population. In the research area of applied anthropometry, collecting and use of 3D anthropometric data have become a norm, which will ultimately result in a better fit between workers and their tools, systems, and work environments.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (2)

Firefighter Anthropometry Datasets

U.S. firefighter anthropometric information is needed to update specifications for fire apparatus and firefighter protective equipment.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (3)

Anthropometric Study of U.S. Truck Drivers

NIOSH launched the first-ever federal anthropometric study of U.S. truck drivers.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (4)

EMT Anthropometry Datasets

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U.S. EMT anthropometric information is needed to improve the workspace design of ambulance patient compartments for safe and effective performance.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (5)

Changing human anthropometry (i.e., population composition, body size, body shape, and aging) in the American workforce requires that workplace layout, equipment, and personal protective devices be re-evaluated to accommodate diverse worker populations for effective injury prevention and control. NIOSH researchers use the NIOSH Anthropometry Research Laboratory to collect and quantify human body size and shape of various occupational groups for use in developing improved equipment designs for worker protection.

Equipped with a series of low-energy three-dimensional scanning devices, the lab was developed in 1995 and remains among only a few research facilities worldwide with similar capabilities and advanced technologies.

Four scanning systems – whole body, head, foot, and hand-held small object scanning – are available for use in a wide variety of research applications.

  • The whole-body scanner has a resolution of 3 mm and requires only 17 seconds to complete a scan.
  • The head scanner captures high resolution image of a subject’s head in just a few seconds.
  • The foot scanner records a subject’s foot in 3-dimensional modes in a few second and reports linear dimensions of the foot as well.
  • The hand-held scanner can be used to capture small stationary objects – such as tools and hands – or large objects – such as cab interiors.

Our scientists have developed a series of anthropometry study procedures for collecting anthropometry data, quantifying human body shape, and evaluating human-equipment interfaces for various protective equipment and workspace design applications.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (6)

The Digital Human Modeling Laboratory is the NIOSH focal point for digital human model development and computerized human-system interface research. The software industry, academia, and research organizations regularly use updated digital human models for biomechanical simulations, various computational health research applications, and product design. This lab allows for the development of digital human models of occupational populations for such applications. Compared to typical digital models of general civilian population and military personnel, the occupational models have distinct body dimensional features.

The lab also incorporates high-end computer workstations and software applications for the establishment and analysis of digitized models of the human form. Software packages include JACK, Polyworks, ANSYS, ADAMS, and 3DS Max, among others. Developed in 1995, the lab features a series of digital models of farm tractor operators, truck trailer drivers, fall-arrest harness users, and firefighters.

Among the projects that used digital human models are:

  • Farm tractor protective volume estimation
  • Biomechanical assessment of lower extremity joint loading during drywall stilt use
  • Development of truck driver body models for truck cab design
  • Determination of eyewear protective coverage
  • Design of ambulance compartments for emergency responders and patient safety
  • Fall-arrest harness fit assessments

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (7)

Like the in-house Anthropometry Research Laboratory, the Mobile Anthropometry Laboratory contains a whole body and head scanner mounted inside a 30-foot trailer. The mobile lab also houses foot and hand scanners and space for traditional measurement using calipers.

This lab allows us to capture a broader demographic of workers from different geographic locations. Previous NIOSH studies on firefighters and truck drivers revealed the difficulty in recruiting subjects who reside more than 30 miles away from data collection sites. A mobile data collection unit provides a solution to reach out to target worker populations in a timely and cost-effective manner for ongoing and future projects. The trailer has been moved across the United States to capture different populations of workers, such as emergency medical service (EMS) workers.

Contact Person: Hongwei Hsiao, Ph.D.
Chief, Protective Technology Branch
Phone: (304) 285-5910
Email: HHsiao@cdc.gov

The Division of Safety Research uses a number of labs to conduct research that identifies, reduces, and prevents work-related injuries and deaths across all industries.

Learn more about our labs: download the brochure.

Publications

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (9)

Anthropometric study of emergency medical services providers (EMSP) in the United States
Journal of Safety Research: July 2020 / 74:187-197
This report provides the summary statistics (means, standard deviation, and percentiles) of the study’s results and examined the anthropometric differences between the EMSP dataset and the U.S. general population, and between the EMSP dataset and U.S. military personnel dataset, respectively.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (10)

NIOSH Public Safety Program
NIOSH Publication No. 2019-169 (September 2019)
The Public Safety Program provides leadership to prevent injuries, illnesses and fatalities among workers in law enforcement, fire service, corrections, and the emergency medical service (EMS). This snapshot shows recent accomplishments and upcoming work.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (11)

Firefighter hand anthropometry and structural glove sizing: a new perspective
Human Factors: December 2015 / 57(8):1359-1377
This study presented the most up-to-date firefighter hand anthropometry and evaluated the current use and fit of structural firefighting gloves. The results show that the current national standard structural firefighting glove sizing scheme underrepresents firefighter hand-size range and shape variation. An improved sizing scheme that better accommodates the U.S. firefighter population was proposed. The new system considered both hand size and hand/finger breadth-to-length contrast, which provided a new perspective for establishing improved hand models and national glove specifications to advance glove design.

Seat and seatbelt accommodation in fire apparatus: Anthropometric aspects
Applied Ergonomics: May 2015 / 51(11):137-151
This study collected body dimension data on a representative sample of 951 U.S. firefighters, and applied the information to assess how well fire apparatus seat and seat belt designs accommodate current firefighters. The study found that today’s firefighters, on average, are much larger and have different body dimensions than data from previous generations that were used in the design of fire apparatus. Specifications for seatbelt length, seat width and spacing, and head supports were proposed for fire apparatus manufacturers and standards committees to improve firefighter seat designs and seatbelt usage compliance.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (13)

Anthropometric Study of U.S. Truck Drivers: Methods, Summary Statistics, and Multivariate Accommodation Models
NIOSH Publication No. 2015-116 (April 2015)
Since up-to-date anthropometric data, which plays an important role in improving ergonomic design of truck cabs, has not been collected for decades, NIOSH launched the first-ever federal anthropometric study of U.S. truck drivers. This document summarizes the results of the study that, we hope, will be used by truck manufacturers, parts suppliers, transportation researchers, fleet managers, and other interested parties for decades to come.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (14)

Comparison of Measured and Self-Reported Anthropometric Information among Firefighters: Implications and Applications
Ergonomics: December 2014 / 57(12):1886-1897
This study evaluated the accuracy of self-reported body weight and height compared to measured values among firefighters and identified factors associated with reporting error. The results showed that the self-reported approach is not a sustainable option for substituting for a professional anthropometric survey to lessen survey cost for protective equipment design applications. Self-reported anthropometric information is undependable in important population subgroups.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (15)

Sizing firefighters: method and implications
{NIOSH 2014 Bullard-Sherwood Transfer of Knowledge Award}
Human Factors: August 2014 / 56(5):873-910
This paper provided the first available U.S. national firefighter anthropometric information for fire apparatus design and presented a comprehensive data process method to assist data users in the business of firefighter safety and fire apparatus standards development to advance national standards on seat, seatbelt, structural firefighting gloves, fire truck cab, and protective clothing. View the Firefighter Datasets.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (16)

Research to improve extension ladder angular positioning and Extension Ladder Safety App (Android and iPhone
{2015 Federal Health Information Technology Innovation Award; NIOSH 2014 Alice Hamilton Engineering Award}
Applied Ergonomics: May 2013 / 44(3):496-502
The research provided scientific basis for the development and validation of a patented multimodal (visual, audio, and vibration) indicator to assist ladder users correctly set the inclination of angle of ladders to reduce ladder-slipping incidents; this invention was further developed to become a popular software application for mobile devices which features a multimodal indicator and a graphic-oriented guide for ladder selection, inspection, positioning, and safe use.

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Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (17)

Anthropometric procedures for protective equipment sizing and design
{Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2012 Human Factors Prize}
Human Factors: February 2013 / 55(1):6-35
This “science behind design” paper introduced a series of anthropometric theories and a 6-step process paradigm for quantifying human body shape and defining personal protective equipment fit and sizing schemes, which has become a most-read Human Factors Journal article, a critical reference for product design, and popular college course material in human factors engineering.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (18)

Head-and-face shape variations of U.S. civilian workers
Applied Ergonomics: February 2013 / 44(5):775-784
This study examined the head-and-face shape variation of the U.S. civilian workforce, using principle component analysis techniques. It also presented a computer graphics based intuitive visualization method for readers to visualize shape variation among civilian populations. The information on the range of head-and-face shape variation is critical for designing effective respirators and head protective gear.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (19)

U.S. truck driver anthropometric study and multivariate anthropometric models for cab designs
{NIOSH 2011 Bullard-Sherwood Transfer of Knowledge Award}
Human Factors: October 2012 / 54(5):849-871
This paper presented the first comprehensive national truck driver anthropometry data for safer semi-trailer truck designs, which have been adopted by truck manufacturers, parts suppliers, and digital software developers to improve the design of next generation truck cabs and begin updating truck cab configuration industrial standards for improved driver health and public safety.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (20)

Impact of harness fit on suspension tolerance
Human Factors: June 2012 / 54(3):346-357
This paper provided scientific basis for standards writers, fall-arrest harness designers, and harness manufacturers to improve harness configurations and fit testing procedures for improved worker protection against suspension trauma (a fatal distress caused by reduced recirculation of blood from the legs to heart after a fall arrest) and recommended an incident response time window of 9 minutes in worker-fall rescue plans to alleviate suspension trauma.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (21)

Digital 3-D headforms with facial features representative of the current US workforce
Ergonomics: May 2010 / 53(5):661-671
This study developed a new approach for constructing head forms that takes into account the facial form (size and shape) of the US workforce, based on an anthropometric survey of 3997 respirator users. It also presented five digital 3-D head forms to replace existing 30-year-old head forms. These new head forms are being incorporated into respirator research, certification standards, and design in efforts to reduce the risk of illness caused by inhalation hazards.

Development of sizing structure for fall arrest harness design
{NIOSH 2010 Alice Hamilton Human Studies Award}
Ergonomics: September 2009 / 52(9):1128-1143
This paper reports a series of 4 studies on worker-harness interfaces for fall-arrest-harness design and production to protect diverse worker populations, using the most current 3-D whole-body digital scanning technology and an innovative 3-D procedure to quantify human torso-shape effect on harness fit. The improved harness sizing system that accommodates diverse populations in the current workforce has been adopted by harness manufacturers to develop the next-generation harnesses.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (23)

Harness sizing and strap length configurations
{NIOSH 2010 Alice Hamilton Engineering Award}
Human Factors: August 2009 / 51(4):497-518
This paper described the development of fall-arrest harness sizing configurations to protect diverse worker populations and the determination of strap cut lengths and adjustment ranges of fall-arrest harness components for manufacturing purposes, using a national whole-body digital scan database and a computer graphics process technique, which have been adopted by leading harness manufacturers to develop the next-generation harnesses.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (24)

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Anthropometric Criteria for the Design of Tractor Cabs and Protection Frames
{NIOSH 2006 Alice Hamilton Engineering Award}
Ergonomics: March 2005 / 48(4):323-353
This paper presented a revolutionary 3-dimensional whole-body scanning approach to study how human body shape and dimensions interact with farm tractor-cab layout to affect safe tractor operation, and provided representative digital human models for tractor manufacturers to assess their current tractor-cab accommodation and revise current tractor cab standards, which have had a positive impact on 6 million agriculture workers who operate farm machines.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (25)

Evaluating the representativeness of the LANL respirator fit test panels for the current U.S. civilian workers
Journal of the International Society for Respiratory Protection: September 2004 / 21:83-93
This national head-and-face anthropometry study of respiratory users identified that the existing (as of 2004) full-face-piece respirator fit test panels, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1973, excluded the coverage of 15.3% of the U.S. civilian workers; the study led to a major revamp of respirator fit test panels and modifications of specifications of international standards on respirator fit test panels.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (26)

Sizing and Fit of Fall-Protection Harnesses
{2002 Liberty Mutual Prize, International Ergonomics Association}
Ergonomics: October 2003 / 46(12):1233-1258
This paper introduced a 3-dimensional full-body laser scanning concept to evaluate the fit and sizing efficacy of a fall-arrest harness system and presented a 15 representative body model method for testing existing harness designs, which laid the foundation for engineering anthropometry for personal protective equipment advancement.

Anthropometry | NIOSH | CDC (27)

Anthropometric differences among occupational groups
Ergonomics: February 2002 / 45(2):136-152
This paper identified occupation as a critical factor (along with gender, age, and race/ethnicity) affecting population anthropometry and thus safety applications, which is a keystone paper that led to a series of national occupational anthropometry studies for improved safety controls and protection to occupational groups (e.g., firefighters, law enforcement officers, truck drivers, farm workers, and emergency medical service workers).

NIOSH anthropometric data and ISO digital headforms
NIOSH Dataset, RD-1013-2020-0: April 2020

Promotion of alternative-sized personal protective equipment
Journal of Safety Research: December 2017 / 63:43-46

Proceedings of the 2017 International Symposium on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care: Impact of age and body mass index on anthropometry in working adults
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society: September 2017 / 61(1):1341-1345

Access to properly fitting personal protective equipment for female construction workers
American Journal of Industrial Medicine: November 2016 / 59(11):1032-1040

Suspension trauma and fall-arrest harness design
CRC Press: October 2016 / :109-118

Firefighter hand anthropometry and structural glove sizing: a new perspective
Human Factors: December 2015 / 57(8):1359-1377

Effect of pregnancy upon facial anthropometrics and respirator fit testing
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene: November 2015 / 12(11):761-766

Digital 3-D headforms representative of Chinese workers
The Annals of Occupational Hygiene: January 2012 / 56(1):113-122

Facial anthropometric differences among gender, ethnicity, and age groups
The Annals of Occupational Hygiene: March 2010 / 54(4):391-402

Shape analysis of 3D head scan data for U.S. respirator users
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing: January 2010 / 2010:248954

Anthropometric changes among U.S. truck drivers
Proceedings of the 17th World Congress on Ergonomics (IEA2009): August 9-14, 2009 Beijing, China
Madison, WI: International Ergonomics Association: August 2009 / :1-4

Hand dimensions of Hispanic and other ethnic group meat processing workers
Proceedings of the 17th World Congress on Ergonomics (IEA2009): August 9-14, 2009 Beijing, China
Madison, WI: International Ergonomics Association: August 2009 / :1-5

Safety eyewear: How much coverage does it provide?
Professional Safety: July 2009 / 54(7):22-27

Evaluation of fall arrest harness sizing schemes
Human Factors: June 2007 / 49(3):447-464

Glove fit for firefighters – an accommodation comparison between U.S. NFPA 1971 and European EN 659 glove size schemes with a contemporary (CAESAR) anthropometric hand size database
The 7th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion: June 6-9, 2004 Vienna, Austria
Kuratorium für Schutz und Sicherheit/Institut Sicher Leben: June 2004 / :752-753

Anthropometric procedures for design decisions: from flat map to 3D scanning
Contemporary Ergonomics: Proceedings of the Ergonomics Society Conference: April 2004 Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press: April 2004 / :144-148

Anthropomorphic Difference Among Hispanic Occupational Groups
National Occupational Injury Research Symposium (NOIRS)-2003: October 28-30, 2003 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. D5.2

Improving Fall Protection Harness Safety: Contribution of 3-D Scanning
Scanning 2000–Numerisation 3D. 5th ed. Proceedings of the Industrial Congress on 3D Digitizing, Paris, France, Dinard Cedex, France: Harbour: May 24-25, 2000 pp. 117-128

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FAQs

What are the 4 anthropometric measurements? ›

The core elements of anthropometry are height, weight, head circumference, body mass index (BMI), body circumferences to assess for adiposity (waist, hip, and limbs), and skinfold thickness.

What is anthropometry example? ›

Anthropometric measurements included weight, height, body mass index (BMI), body circumference (arm, waist, hip and calf), waist to hip ratio (WHR), elbow amplitude and knee-heel length.

What are the 2 types of anthropometry? ›

Anthropometrics - measurement of the dimensions of the body and other physical characteristics. There are two types of measurement: Static. Dynamic.

How do you calculate anthropometry? ›

Body Mass Index (BMI)

BMI = weight in pounds / [height in inches x height in inches] x 703. BMI = weight in kilograms / [height in meters x height in meters]

What is anthropometry used for? ›

Anthropometry is the science that defines physical measures of a person's size, form, and functional capacities.

How do you measure your body? ›

How to take body measurements with an inch tape - YouTube

What's anthropometry mean? ›

Anthropometry involves the systematic measurement of the physical properties of the human body, primarily dimensional descriptors of body size and shape.

What is anthropometry in design? ›

Anthropometrics is a type of architecture design that attempts to make everyone as comfortable as possible. This means that the room's dimensions must be acceptable, with high ceilings, broad doorways and hallways, and so on.

Why is anthropometric data important? ›

Anthropometric measurements are important for the evaluation of morbidities of individuals in society and thus meet the requirements of that society. For human health, the field of medicine requires constant development and renewal.

Who created anthropometry? ›

Anthropometry, designed by Alphonse Bertillon, began in 1890 and lasted approximately 20 years before being replaced by fingerprint identification. Alphonse's father, Louis Bertillon, a famous French physician and anthropologist, largely influenced Alfonse's knowledge and interest in the human skeletal system.

How is anthropometry data used in design? ›

Anthropometrics is the practice of taking measurements of the human body and provides categorised data that can be used by designers. Anthropometrics help designers collect useful data, eg head circumferences when designing a safety helmet.

Is anthropometry still used today? ›

Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics, and architecture, where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products.

How do you read anthropometric measurements? ›

Anthropometric measurements assess the size, shape, and proportions of the human body. Commonly used anthropometric measurements include length/height, weight, and MUAC. When two or more anthropometric measurements are combined with each other or with age, it is called an anthropometric index.

What is anthropometric test? ›

Anthropometric measurements are used to determine a human being's nutritional and general health status. Measuring weight and height of infants and children is an international health practice that provides a readily accessible, inexpensive, objective method to ascertain the health history and health status of a child.

What are the most common anthropometric measurements? ›

Height (or length) and weight are the most common anthropometric measures used to indicate protein-energy nutritional status in emergencies.

What is direct anthropometry? ›

Direct anthropometry consists of linear measurements between anthropometric landmarks performed directly on the body of the patient.

How do you measure yourself? ›

How to Measure Yourself - YouTube

What is ideal body measurements? ›

The specific proportions of 36–24–36 inches (90-60-90 centimeters) have frequently been given as the "ideal", or "hourglass" proportions for women since at least the 1960s (these measurements are, for example, the title of a hit instrumental by The Shadows).

What are anthropometric tools? ›

Anthropometric tools are instruments for the measurement of different parts of the body as muscle, bones, and adipose tissue or body fat. Sometimes the terminology of anthropometric equipment types can be confusing.

What is anthropometrics data? ›

The field of anthropometry. encompasses a variety of human body. measurements, such as weight, height, and size, including skinfold thicknesses, circumferences, lengths, and breadths.

What are the advantages of anthropometric assessment? ›

Anthropometric measurements are useful tools for the detection of deviations from normal nutritional status [1]. They also provide indications concerning lean body mass (LBM) and fat mass (FM). Variations of LBM and FM in quantities and distributions can be used as indicators of the global nutritional status [2].

What is anthropometry PDF? ›

∗Anthropometry is the study of the measurement of the. human body in terms of the dimensions of bone, muscle, and adipose (fat) tissue. The word “anthropometry” is. derived from the Greek word “anthropo” meaning.

What is functional anthropometry? ›

Functional anthropometry includes measurement of reaching abilities, maneuvering and other aspects of space and equipment use from a wheeled mobility device. The database used for accessibility standards in the United States was developed in the late 1970's.

What are the principles of anthropometrics? ›

The three ergonomic design principles based on anthropometry are design for a range, design for the extreme and design for the average. The goal of applying the principles of anthropometrics to the workplace is to enhance human performance, control fatigue and prevent accidents.

What is structural anthropometry? ›

Structural anthropometric measurements are used in designing industrial workstations, equipment and tools. In the design of workstations it is essential that the controls, materials, tools and equipment which require manual operation be placed in an area that can be reached and operated efficiently and safely.

How does anthropometry affect design? ›

The use of anthropometrics in building design aims to ensure that every person is as comfortable as possible. In practical terms, this means that the dimensions must be appropriate, ceilings high enough, doorways and hallways wide enough, and so on.

What are the most common anthropometric measurements? ›

Height (or length) and weight are the most common anthropometric measures used to indicate protein-energy nutritional status in emergencies.

What are the 3 types of body measurements? ›

Bust/waist/hip measurements (informally called 'body measurements' or ′vital statistics′) are a common method of specifying clothing sizes. They match the three inflection points of the female body shape.

What are Anthropometrics of the human body? ›

Anthropometry (from the Greek anthropos: human, and metron: measure) refers to the systematic collection and correlation of measurements of human individuals, including the systematic measurement of the physical characteristics of the human body, primarily body weight, body size, and shape.

Why are there different anthropometric measurements? ›

Some anthropometric measurements may not be socially or culturally acceptable, such as the measurement by men of womens' subscapular and supra-iliac skinfold thicknesses; some measurements may be impractical to make, such as the height in people who are unable to stand straight.

Why is anthropometric data important? ›

Anthropometric measurements are important for the evaluation of morbidities of individuals in society and thus meet the requirements of that society. For human health, the field of medicine requires constant development and renewal.

What's anthropometry mean? ›

Anthropometry involves the systematic measurement of the physical properties of the human body, primarily dimensional descriptors of body size and shape.

Why is reporting anthropometry important? ›

The quality of anthropometric data is also important in assessing how health and nutrition interventions are implemented and in guiding subsequent planning.

What body shape is 32 26 34? ›

Hourglass Body Shape

E.g. 32-26-33, 33-27-35, 36-30-38.

How do you measure yourself? ›

How to Measure Yourself - YouTube

What is perfect body size for female? ›

RELATED: Here's How To Figure Out Which Body Shape You Have

Researchers found that the ideal female body has a height of 1.68 meters (5 feet, 5 inches) and has a bust, weight, and waist to hip ratio that measures 99 x 63 x 91 cm (39 x 24 x 36 in), which is an almost exact match to Brook's own measurements.

Why is body measurement important? ›

Without taking body measurements, the fabric material can run out of supply if the tailor uses it too much. And more material is required to fix small dresses or suits. So when body measurements are taken accurately, the tailor will know the exact amount of material to be used.

How is anthropometry data used in design? ›

Anthropometrics is the practice of taking measurements of the human body and provides categorised data that can be used by designers. Anthropometrics help designers collect useful data, eg head circumferences when designing a safety helmet.

Is anthropometry still used today? ›

Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics, and architecture, where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products.

Who created anthropometry? ›

Alphonse Bertillon, (born April 23, 1853, Paris, France—died February 13, 1914, Paris), chief of criminal identification for the Paris police (from 1880) who developed an identification system known as anthropometry, or the Bertillon system, that came into wide use in France and other countries.

What could be done to make anthropometric measurements more accurate? ›

Routine calibration of instruments ensures accurate results by the equipment. Weighing scales, stadiometers, and skin fold calipers should be calibrated.

How do you read anthropometric measurements? ›

Anthropometric measurements assess the size, shape, and proportions of the human body. Commonly used anthropometric measurements include length/height, weight, and MUAC. When two or more anthropometric measurements are combined with each other or with age, it is called an anthropometric index.

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