NSF and ANSI Water Filter Certifications Explained (2022)

When our team of reviewers is looking at a new water filter system, what do you think we check for first? It’s not the price, or the build quality, or even the ease of installation. It’s the filter’s certifications.

Two governing bodies are in charge of providing certifications for water filters, and they’re what separates marketing claims from real performance. If you want a water filter that’s guaranteed to make your water cleaner and better tasting, start by looking at its certifications.

In this guide, we’ll give you the complete rundown of who’s providing this valuable information. That includes a little bit about the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Then we’ll cover the certifications you should be looking for in your water filters, from the most common to the most obscure.

Who Determines Drinking Water Standards?

NSF and ANSI Water Filter Certifications Explained (1)

Under the U.S. Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets legal limits on over 90 contaminants in drinking water. The EPA provides national guidelines, while the SDWA allows individual states to set even more stringent requirements if they so desire. Together, this sets the standard for all of the municipal drinking water that flows through homes in the United States.

Why does this matter? Because the EPA’s standards set safe levels for contaminants — but that doesn’t mean that water is going to taste good. And in the case of what are called emerging contaminants — a class of problematic molecules that come from sources like chemical runoff and pharmaceuticals — the EPA hasn’t actually set standards yet for their levels.

That’s where water filter certification groups step in. They take an even harder line stance on what contaminants each filter can remove. Let’s take a closer look at what makes each organization tick.

(Video) NSF Certified Water Purifiers vs Non-NSF Certified Water Purifiers

The Certification Groups: NSF and ANSI

Two organizations are all important in deciding water filter certifications: The National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

The NSF has been dedicated to promoting better health since its inception in 1944. They’re an independent global organization whose duties include:

  • Testing, inspection, and certification
  • Standards development
  • Training and consulting

And they’re involved in the following industries:

  • Automotive and aerospace
  • Building and construction
  • Food
  • Water
  • Health

This means that overall, the NSF provides important health and safety guidelines for our most essential products and services.

ANSI is a private, non-profit organization founded in 1918. They partner with the NSF to further create and enforce specific product design guidelines. Their broad reach and huge support from multinational companies make it easier to coordinate different aspects of certification.

Together, the NSF and ANSI provide a comprehensive solution to verifying product quality claims. In the case of water filters, this means certifying a filter’s build quality and its ability to effectively filter out specific contaminants.

The Certifications

NSF and ANSI Water Filter Certifications Explained (2)

Each of the certifications awarded by the NSF and ANSI is number-coded. This makes it easy to know at a glance what any given water filter can handle — and whether you need to look elsewhere for your water filter needs. With that in mind, let’s examine each of the relevant certifications in greater detail.

NSF 42 Certification

Certification 42 is the most common one that you’ll find in every class of water filter. It’s a guarantee that a given filter will remove aesthetic impurities. That means bad tastes, smells, and cloudy water can all be fixed by a filter with this certification. This is our baseline comparison; if a filter doesn’t have certification 42, it’s unlikely to be particularly useful.

NSF 44 Certification

Certification 44 deals with a special category of filters that use cation exchange resins. It establishes the guidelines for how much a filter can reduce water hardness. And it also certifies a certain level of build quality and structural integrity of the system. An uncommon certification, it’s what you’ll want to look for if you’re looking to soften your water.

NSF 53 Certification

Certification 53 is one of the “big three” certifications, alongside 42 and 401. According to the NSF, it “establishes minimum requirements for systems designed to reduce specific health-related contaminants”. That means any filter with certification 53 is guaranteed to reduce harmful molecules like lead, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), bacteria, and viruses. If you’re concerned with your water quality’s effect on your health, this certification will fix it.

(Video) NSF Ratings Explained

NSF 55 Certification

Certification 55 is specific to filters that use a UV light system. In these filters, UV light is used to kill or deactivate bacteria, viruses, and cysts. It’s not seen often in filter systems, though some reverse osmosis filters use it as a final cleansing stage.

NSF 58 Certification

Certification 58 is specific to reverse osmosis filter systems. It guarantees the effectiveness of the system’s reverse osmosis membrane. That means it’s certified to remove or reduce the whole range of contaminants indicated by the EPA, and that the structural integrity of the filter is up to par.

NSF 62 Certification

Certification 62 is specific to distillation systems. It guarantees the build quality and filtering capabilities of these systems, which heat water to a boiling point and collect the purified water vapor. Some contaminants like VOCs, though, can easily convert to gas and be carried over in the distillation. That’s why you’ll often see distillation systems paired with certifications 42 and 53, to ensure that contaminants are fully removed.

NSF 177 Certification

Certification 177 is used only for showerhead filters. It means that the filter is certified to reduce freely available chlorine. But it makes no other claims for reducing other contaminants.

NSF 244 Certification

Certification 244 is one of the most uncommon of all. Filters with this certification are able to protect against intermittent bacteria and virus contamination. For example, they’re useful for keeping your water safe during a boil water advisory. Manufacturers of these types of filters can claim bacteria, viruses, and cysts reduction for their products.

NSF 401 Certification

Certification 401 is perhaps the most sought-after certification in current filter systems. It guarantees protection from emerging contaminants. As of now, 15 different emerging contaminants have been identified, ranging from pharmaceutical residue to pesticides to microplastics. Filters with this certification are guaranteed to remove or reduce one or more of these contaminants, protecting against dangers that are not yet regulated by the EPA.

NSF P231 Certification

Certification P231 filters are verified as microbiological purifiers in accordance with guidelines from the EPA. They’re often recommended for well water, since they remove or reduce pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and cysts. In short, this means that P231 filters can make even the most biologically contaminated water safe to drink.

NSF P473 Certification

Certification P473 was created in direct response to the presence of PFOA/PFOS in drinking water. These are man-made chemicals that were in wide use until the early 2000s, which have since been phased out across the globe. P473 filters are guaranteed to remove the presence of these man-made chemicals in your water.

NSF P477 Certification

Certification P477 is about as specific as NSF/ANSI standards get. It means that a filter is certified to remove microcystins, a group of toxins produced by blue-green algae.

How Manufacturers Get Certified (and Why That Matters)

NSF and ANSI Water Filter Certifications Explained (3)

I’ll put this bluntly: Without the NSF and ANSI to certify water filters, finding an effective filter would be nearly impossible.

(Video) Top 5 Best Faucet Water Filters 2022 - (NSF / ANSI Certified)

Companies could make whatever claims they wanted without needing to provide information to back it up. By paying close attention to what certifications a filter system has received, you can rest assured that it’s actually cleaning and purifying your water in the way you desire.

The certification process for water filters is a rigorous one, with seven steps.

Step 1 is an application to be admitted to the NSF’s testing process

Step 2 is where the company submits detailed information on product formulation, toxicology, and product use information.

Step 3 is where the NSF’s technical team performs a thorough review of the formulation and parts list for the filter system in question.

Step 4 is an on-site audit, where NSF technicians tour the production facility and gather samples of products and materials used in the filter system.

Step 5 has these technicians return to the NSF laboratory, where the filter and its components undergo a battery of tests to prove their efficacy.

Step 6 is a final technical evaluation that takes into account every step before it. It’s a final check-over that acts as a safeguard against anything that might have been missed in the process.

Step 7 is the awarding of certification, and companies must renew this certification annually by going through steps 2 through 6 again.

Taken together, this seven-step process guarantees that any products that carry an NSF/ANSI certification are fully tested and guaranteed to perform their advertised functions.

(Video) Top 5 Best Countertop Water Filter Nsf Certified Review 2022

Using Certifications to Compare Similar Products

Having all of these certifications at your fingertips will let you make savvy comparisons between different water filters.

For example: If you found two under sink filters at nearly the same price, which one should you choose? In most cases, it’s best to choose the one with the most robust series of certifications. If one filter system is only rated to Certification 42, and another is rated to Certifications 42, 53, and 401, the second system is obviously a more effective filter.

In situations where two or more filters have the same certifications, though, it’s best to look towards price, build quality, and ease of installation to make your choices.

FAQs for NSF/ANSI Water Filter Certifications

To wrap things up, let’s take a quick look at some of the questions we’ve heard asked most often about water filter certifications.

Is there an NSF water filter certification lookup?

The NSF helpfully provides a database of all the companies that manufacture water filters, and which certifications their products have received.

How do I find out if something is NSF certified?

Manufacturers will proudly display their NSF certifications on their products’ packaging, as well as on their websites. If that fails, use the search function provided above to verify that a company has received certifications for their water filters.

(Video) Best & Safe Faucet Water Filter (Tested & Certified by NSF)

FAQs

What does NSF ANSI 42 & 53 mean? ›

Standard 42 covers aesthetic (taste and odor) claims, while Standard 53 addresses health-related claims. Although both standards cover drinking water filters, the methods of performance testing found in the standards vary.

Is NSF the same as ANSI? ›

NSF is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to develop American National Standards and uses a ballot system similar to ANSI to revise and maintain those standards. Products that meet these requirements bear the NSF mark.

What is NSF ANSI standard? ›

NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects is an American National Standard that establishes minimum health-effects requirements for the chemical contaminants and impurities that are indirectly imparted to drinking water from products, components and materials used in drinking water systems.

What does NSF stand for in water filters? ›

Founded in 1944, the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) is an independent third-party certification and testing organization for products that impact water quality and food safety. Its purpose is to ensure that products perform the way their manufacturers claim they do, and products comply with regulatory standards.

What are NSF ANSI Standards 42 53 and 401? ›

The most common certifications for filtration systems are NSF/ ANSI 42, 53 and 401, which certify that a product reduces a particular set of contaminants from drinking water. This standard establishes minimum requirements for systems designed to reduce non-health-related contaminants.

What does NSF 53 certified mean? ›

NSF Standard 53 is known as the "Health Effects" standard. Water treatment products that are certified as NSF/ANSI standard 53 water filters receive this certification for their ability to reduce or remove harmful contaminants in unfiltered water that are known to cause adverse health effects.

How do I know if my filter is NSF? ›

Look for certification.

One way to figure out what a water filter does is to look for an NSF certification mark on the label. You can look up specific products in the NSF database to see what your water filter is certified to protect against.

What does NSF ANSI 61 mean? ›

This standard—NSF/ANSI/CAN 61-2021: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects—sets minimum health effects requirements for the chemical contaminants and impurities imparted from products, components, and materials to drinking water systems.

Does NSF mean potable water? ›

A water filter that is “NSF-Listed' or has claims that it is “NSF-Certified” basically means: It's been thoughtfully designed and carefully constructed. Uses established water treatment media and methods. Its construction materials are tested and documented to be appropriate for potable water use.

What is NSF ANSI 60 certification? ›

NSF/ANSI 60: Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals – Health Effects is an American National Standard that establishes the minimum health-effects requirements for the chemicals, chemical contaminants and impurities that are directly added to drinking water from drinking water treatment chemicals.

How important is NSF certification? ›

NSF certification is your key to making sure that the products you use meet strict standards for public health protection. Choosing a product certified by NSF lets you know the company complies with strict standards and procedures imposed by NSF.

Is NSF certification required? ›

NSF requires the most specified certification and is so widespread that just about every new kitchen or restaurant will require NSF-certified products. Health Codes. Depending on your local health codes, certain pieces of equipment will most likely need to be NSF certified.

What does NSF ANSI 58 mean? ›

NSF/ANSI 58 is the American National Standard for point-of-use (POU) reverse osmosis (RO) systems. It was. developed by a joint committee with equal representation from regulators, manufacturers and end users.

What does NSF 372 certified mean? ›

What does NSF/ANSI 372 or NSF 372 mean? NSF 372 is consistent with the United States Safe Drinking Water Act and meets the requirement of several U.S. states, including California. Testing determines the lead content based on the wetted surface area of products, not what the products themselves are made from.

Is Brita filter NSF 53 certified? ›

The Brita Longlast Filter (Model OB06) has been tested and certified by the WQA in models OB01, OB11, OB24, OB46 (Everyday), OB48, and OB51 against NSF/ANSI Standards 42 and 53 and in models OB21, OB32(Amalfi), OB36(Color Series), OB41, OB43(Capri), OB44 (Mini Plus), OB47, OB50, and OB53 against NSF/ANSI Standards 42, ...

What does NSF 401 certified mean? ›

NSF/ANSI 401: Emerging Contaminants/Incidental Compounds is an American national standard that verifies the ability of a water treatment device to reduce up to 15 of the emerging contaminants shown below.

What do NSF 42 filters remove? ›

NSF/ANSI 42 – Removes non-harmful impurities such as chlorine and chloramine. NSF/ANSI 53 – Reduces contaminants with health effects, such as cysts (cryptosporidium, giardia), mercury, lead, MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), turbidity, and asbestos.

What does NSF 401 filter out? ›

A filter with an NSF 401 certification may remove or reduce up to 15 kinds of emerging impurities, such as flame retardants, prescription drugs, detergents, and certain herbicides and pesticides.

What is the NSF 42 standard? ›

NSF Standards for Drinking Water Treatment Units

NSF/ANSI Standard 42 covers POU and POE systems designed to reduce specific aesthetic or non-health-related contaminants (such as chlorine, taste and odor, and particulates) that may be present in public or private drinking water.

What NSF 44? ›

NSF/ANSI 44 establishes the minimum requirements for certification of residential water softeners using a cation exchange resin that is regenerated with sodium or potassium chloride, reducing hardness from public or private water supplies.

What NSF 51? ›

NSF-51 is the standard for “Plastic Material and Components used in Food Equipment”, and deals with materials and products used in contact with foods and beverages.

What certifications should I look for in a water filter? ›

NSF certification verifies that a water filter will reduce the contaminants the manufacturer claims, such as chlorine, lead, and mercury for example. The NSF mark is well recognized by those who work in public health worldwide.

Are Pur filters NSF certified? ›

PUR faucet filters are certified by both the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and Water Quality Association (WQA) and reduce 10x more contaminants than the leading Brita water pitcher.

Which filter is best for drinking water? ›

Our Recommendations
  • Best Overall: Big Berkey Gravity Fed Water Filter.
  • Best Under Sink: Frizzlife Under Sink Water Filter System.
  • Best for Faucets: Pur Plus Faucet Mount Water Filtration System.
  • Best Whole House: Express Water 3 Stage Whole House Water Filtration System.
  • Best Pitcher: Pur Classic 11 Cup Water Filter.
12 Aug 2022

What is the difference between NSF 60 and NSF 61? ›

The standards provide criteria in the design, construction and operation of public water systems. NSF/ANSI Standard 60 includes requirements for chemicals that are used to treat drinking water; Standard 61 includes requirements for all materials that come in contact with drinking water...

What does NSF 61 9 mean? ›

Certify to NSF/ANSI/CAN 61 with NSF. This standard assures that unsafe levels of lead and other harmful contaminants do not leach into drinking water.

What is the difference between NSF 61 and NSF 372? ›

NSF/ANSI 372 includes a broader scope of drinking water products covered by the law which may not be covered under NSF/ANSI 61 (e.g. coffee machines; food service equipment) and enables large or complex products and assemblies to achieve certification for the 2014 lead-free law that previously were unable to be ...

How much does NSF 61 certification cost? ›

What are the typical costs of certification? NSF61 certification ranges between $12,000 and $16,000 for one production location with a family of products.

How do I find my NSF rating? ›

The NSF certification process is specific to the product, process or service being certified and the type of certification, but generally follows seven steps:
  1. Application and information submission.
  2. Product evaluation.
  3. Product testing in lab.
  4. Manufacturing facility inspection, production confirmation and product sampling.

Is 304 stainless NSF approved? ›

Eighteen percent chromium. That's above the FDA minimum of 16% chromium, so yes, 304 Stainless Steel is FDA approved. It is also American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and National Science Foundation (NSF) approved for food contact, as they have the same minimum chromium content.

What does ANSI certified mean? ›

Becoming ANSI Accredited means that the CCIFP certification meets the highest of standards. This provides an added level of confidence in the certification and the people who hold the CCIFP designation. It also protects the integrity of ICCIFP and its legal defensibly.

What does it mean to be NSF approved? ›

NSF certification is a third-party seal of approval administered by NSF International. The certification indicates that a product or service complies with predetermined standards of quality, safety, and sanitation. NSF, by the way, stands for “National Sanitation Foundation”.

Is NSF 61 required? ›

Overview. If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI/CAN 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

What is the meaning of NSF? ›

(ɛn ɛs ɛf) or not sufficient funds. abbreviation. (Finance: Banking) A check where there is not enough money in the account to pay for it will be marked NSF. NSF checks may be rejected by the bank, or, alternatively, the bank customer may set up an overdraft loan account, which will cover these checks.

How much does NSF certification cost? ›

NSF Certification: $1,500-$2,500, depending on the number and types of products to be approved. The costs for this step will be provided to the client prior to any work being performed.

What does the NSF inspection? ›

A National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) certification is a certification that signifies a food product meets the public health and safety standards set by the NSF. It's a third-party nonprofit certification that applies to the appliances and products found in a commercial kitchen.

What equipment needs to be NSF certified? ›

NSF has developed standards for a wide range of food handling equipment, including food preparation and dispensing equipment, ice makers, refrigerators and freezers, dishwashing sinks, vending machines, mobile food carts, and service counters.

What does NSF mean in a commercial kitchen? ›

What is NSF? NSF International (formerly the National Sanitation Foundation) is a third-party company that does a complete check of various foodservice equipment and supplies to ensure they meet or exceed NSF's standards for cleanability, sanitation, and food protection.

Does NSF mean food safe? ›

Ensuring accountability from farm to fork, the NSF is known as “The Most Trusted Name in Food Safety™.” Today, the NSF mark is the only certification that identifies food safe chemicals.

What NSF 177? ›

NSF/ANSI 177 establishes minimum certification requirements for shower filters: material safety, structural integrity, minimum flow rate, FAC reduction and literature. A shower filter is defined as a point-of-use system used for the reduction of substances affecting aesthetic qualities of shower water.

Who regulates water filters? ›

The EPA regulates over 80 contaminants—including arsenic, e-coli, cryptosporidia, chlorine, and lead—that may be found in drinking water from public water systems. While the EPA says that 90 percent of US public water systems meet its standards, you may want to use a water filter to further ensure your water's safety.

Why is Berkey not NSF? ›

No NSF/ANSI Certification

Berkey Water Filters do not have NSF/ANSI certification for two main reasons. First, the independent lab tests we have, test for far more contaminants than the applicable NSF/ANSI certifications. Secondly, the fees for NSF/ANSI certifications are very cost-prohibitive for what is being tested.

Is NSF 61 drinking water Safe? ›

NSF-61 Certification: Good For Water Systems, Good For Citizens. NSF-61 certification has broad benefits for both water systems and consumers. Residents can have peace of mind that the water coming out of their tap is safe to drink. These regulations are also good for water systems.

Does NSF 372 mean lead free? ›

NSF/ANSI 372 is consistent with the United States Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and its lead-free plumbing requirements, as well as the requirements of individual U.S. states such as California.

What NSF 61 372? ›

The NSF 61 and NSF 372 SCAM

Since 1986, the Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA” or “the Act”) has prohibited the use of certain items that are not lead free and since 1996 the Act has made it unlawful for anyone to introduce into commerce items that are not lead free.

Why is LifeStraw not NSF certified? ›

LifeStraw don't submit their products to the industry-leading certifying body, the NSF. However, they do claim to test their products to NSF standards via their own labs and third-party overseas certifiers. According to the brand, their filter meets NSF standards: 42: improves the taste and smell of water.

Is a Brita pitcher NSF certified? ›

The best NSF-certified filter: Brita Longlast+

Out of the NSF certified brands, the biggest players are Pur and Brita. The two brands tend to flip flop as to who sells the filter certified for removing the most contaminants.

Which is better Brita or Pur or zero water? ›

In the battle of Brita vs PUR vs ZeroWater, we did choose Brita as the winner, but that doesn't mean we recommend it. There are better options available. Water filtration is one of those things that's not worth skimping on, especially considering the low cost of superior systems.

Is Brita filter NSF 53 certified? ›

The Brita Longlast Filter (Model OB06) has been tested and certified by the WQA in models OB01, OB11, OB24, OB46 (Everyday), OB48, and OB51 against NSF/ANSI Standards 42 and 53 and in models OB21, OB32(Amalfi), OB36(Color Series), OB41, OB43(Capri), OB44 (Mini Plus), OB47, OB50, and OB53 against NSF/ANSI Standards 42, ...

What does NSF 372 certified mean? ›

What does NSF/ANSI 372 or NSF 372 mean? NSF 372 is consistent with the United States Safe Drinking Water Act and meets the requirement of several U.S. states, including California. Testing determines the lead content based on the wetted surface area of products, not what the products themselves are made from.

What is NSF 401 certified? ›

NSF/ANSI 401: Emerging Contaminants/Incidental Compounds is an American national standard that verifies the ability of a water treatment device to reduce up to 15 of the emerging contaminants shown below.

What NSF 55? ›

NSF/ANSI 55

Ultraviolet treatment systems use ultraviolet light to inactivate or kill bacteria, viruses and cysts in contaminated water (Class A systems) or to reduce the amount of non-disease causing bacteria in disinfected drinking water (Class B).

Why is LifeStraw not NSF certified? ›

LifeStraw don't submit their products to the industry-leading certifying body, the NSF. However, they do claim to test their products to NSF standards via their own labs and third-party overseas certifiers. According to the brand, their filter meets NSF standards: 42: improves the taste and smell of water.

Are Pur filters NSF certified? ›

PUR faucet filters are certified by both the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and Water Quality Association (WQA) and reduce 10x more contaminants than the leading Brita water pitcher.

Which water filter removes the most contaminants? ›

Reverse osmosis systems are some of the best options for your water. The Reverse osmosis system in the 4 stage design is a design that will help you remove the maximum number of contaminants from your water.

What is the difference between NSF 61 and NSF 372? ›

NSF/ANSI 372 includes a broader scope of drinking water products covered by the law which may not be covered under NSF/ANSI 61 (e.g. coffee machines; food service equipment) and enables large or complex products and assemblies to achieve certification for the 2014 lead-free law that previously were unable to be ...

What do NSF 42 filters remove? ›

NSF/ANSI 42 – Removes non-harmful impurities such as chlorine and chloramine. NSF/ANSI 53 – Reduces contaminants with health effects, such as cysts (cryptosporidium, giardia), mercury, lead, MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), turbidity, and asbestos.

Is NSF 61 drinking water Safe? ›

NSF-61 Certification: Good For Water Systems, Good For Citizens. NSF-61 certification has broad benefits for both water systems and consumers. Residents can have peace of mind that the water coming out of their tap is safe to drink. These regulations are also good for water systems.

What does NSF ANSI 58 mean? ›

NSF/ANSI 58 is the American National Standard for point-of-use (POU) reverse osmosis (RO) systems. It was. developed by a joint committee with equal representation from regulators, manufacturers and end users.

What does NSF 51 mean? ›

NSF-51 is the standard for “Plastic Material and Components used in Food Equipment”, and deals with materials and products used in contact with foods and beverages.

What is the NSF 42 standard? ›

NSF Standards for Drinking Water Treatment Units

NSF/ANSI Standard 42 covers POU and POE systems designed to reduce specific aesthetic or non-health-related contaminants (such as chlorine, taste and odor, and particulates) that may be present in public or private drinking water.

What NSF 44? ›

NSF/ANSI 44 establishes the minimum requirements for certification of residential water softeners using a cation exchange resin that is regenerated with sodium or potassium chloride, reducing hardness from public or private water supplies.

Does NSF mean potable water? ›

A water filter that is “NSF-Listed' or has claims that it is “NSF-Certified” basically means: It's been thoughtfully designed and carefully constructed. Uses established water treatment media and methods. Its construction materials are tested and documented to be appropriate for potable water use.

What NSF 177? ›

NSF/ANSI 177 establishes minimum certification requirements for shower filters: material safety, structural integrity, minimum flow rate, FAC reduction and literature. A shower filter is defined as a point-of-use system used for the reduction of substances affecting aesthetic qualities of shower water.

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